THE CLOCK OF PROVIDENCE

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“There is a clock with which Providence keeps time and pace — and God Himself sets it!”

Our time is always now, for we are in selfish haste. But everything happens according to God’s divine time-table. Our sovereign God is never before His time — and never too late. We may well admire the punctuality of Heaven.

Our trials come in due season — and leave at the appointed moment. Our fretfulness will neither hasten nor delay the purposes of our sovereign God.

We are in hot haste to order all our affairs. But the Lord has the leisure of omnipotence and unerring wisdom — and it will be well for us to learn to wait. The clock will not strike until the hour; but when the instant comes, we shall hear the bell.

My soul, trust in God, and wait patiently when He says, “My time has not yet come — but your time is always here!” John 7:6

— Charles Spurgeon

Romans 8:28 And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.

Ecclesiastes 3:1 To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:

 

CHARLES H. SPURGEON ON CHRISTMASS

“We have no superstitious regard for times and seasons. Certainly, we do not believe in the present ecclesiastical arrangement called Christmas: first, because we do not believe in the mass at all, but abhor it, whether it be said or sung in Latin or in English; and, secondly, because we find no Scriptural warrant whatever for observing any day as the birthday of the Saviour; and, consequently, its observance is a superstition, because not of divine authority.

Superstition has fixed most positively the day of our Saviour’s birth, although there is no possibility of discovering when it occured. Fabricius gives a catalogue of 136 different learned opinions upon the matter; and various divines invent weighty arguments for advocating a date in every month of the year.

It was not till the middle of the third century that any part of the church celebrated the nativity of our Lord, and it was not till very long after the Western church had set the example that the Eastern adopted it. Because the day is not known, therefore superstition has fixed it; while, since the death of our Saviour might be determined with much certainty, therefore superstition shifts the date of its observance every year.

Where is the method in the madness of the superstitious? Probably the fact is that the holy days were arranged to fit in with the heathen festivals. We venture to assert, that if there be any day in the year, of which we may be pretty sure that it was not the day on which the Saviour was born, it is the twenty-fifth of December.”

From a sermon delivered on the Lord’s Day morning,
24th December, 1871
At the Metropolitan Tabernacle
Newington, London